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COMPOST
To Combat Climate Change

Facts about Compost and Carbon Sequestration  
  • Harvesting crops removes carbon from the soil that would otherwise return to the soil when the plant dies and decomposes

  • Compost returns organic matter to the soil

  • The nitrogen in compost can increase soil productivity, which can lead to increased crop residues and an increased return of carbon to the soil

  • Composting increases the formation of stable carbon that remains bound in the soil for long periods of time

  • Applying organic matter to soils is one of the most effective ways to divert CO2 from the atmosphere and convert it into organic carbon in soils

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nature Now International (NNI) - West Valley Collection and Recycling (WVCR) Partnership  

Formed in 2018 to promote residential and school waste management and composting

(compliant with California State Law)

 

 

Scientists have warned that increased wind, dry conditions, and higher temperatures brought about by climate change are leading to more intense and widespread wildfires. We must do our part to combat climate change, and we can make a powerful impact by reducing greenhouse gas emissions from landfills. 

We created a partnership with West Valley Collection and Recycling (WVCR) in 2019 to mobilize young people to promote school campus waste management and the diversion of waste to recycling and compost sites. The WVCR program supports California State Law AB 32 (California Global Warming Solutions Act), which requires the state to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and California law AB 1826 (California Integrated Waste Management Act), which mandates that institutions (including schools) decrease their landfill wastes. (http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/recycle/commercial/organics/

This hands-on process will raise awareness about health, nutrition, food waste, and consumption of single-use plastics at a time when our world’s resources are being depleted, and plastics are destroying valuable habitats and ecosystems. Students, together with the cafeteria staff, the maintenance team, and interested faculty, will help properly sort the waste in the cafeteria and on campus so that WVCR can divert our waste to recycling and compost sites.

SHS Art Club, featuring lead artist Samika Agarwal, paint school recycle bins

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